Possession of Drugs ORC § 2925.11

Definition of Possession of Drugs:

  • Obtaining, possessing, or using,
  • A controlled substance.

Potential Consequences:

A finding of guilt in an offense of possession of drugs can range from felony to minor misdemeanor depending on the schedule of the drugs involved as well as the amount alleged. As such, there can be a wide variety of potential penalties that the prosecution will be seeking to impose. For this reason, it is especially important to have an experienced legal representative in order to navigate these complex legal ramifications.

At Funkhouser Law, from the moment a client walks through the door, we presume that they are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. As such, we work hard to accomplish the most favorable outcome for each of our clients. If you have been accused of drug possession, please call Funkhouser Law for a free consultation with an experienced peer-rated lawyer.

The Drug Schedule:

Schedule I

Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Some examples of Schedule I drugs are:

heroin, LSD, marijuana, ecstasy, methaqualone, and peyote

Schedule II

Schedule II drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous. Some examples of Schedule II drugs are:

Vicodin, cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, Dilaudid, Demerol, oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Ritalin

Schedule III

Schedule III drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. Schedule III drugs abuse potential is less than Schedule I and Schedule II drugs but more than Schedule IV. Some examples of Schedule III drugs are:

Products containing less than 90 milligrams of codeine per dosage unit (Tylenol with codeine), ketamine, anabolic steroids, testosterone

Schedule IV

Schedule IV drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence. Some examples of Schedule IV drugs are:

Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, Ambien, Tramadol

Schedule V

Schedule V drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV and consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics. Schedule V drugs are generally used for antidiarrheal, antitussive, and analgesic purposes. Some examples of Schedule V drugs are:

cough preparations with less than 200 milligrams of codeine or per 100 milliliters (Robitussin AC), Lomotil, Motofen, Lyrica, Parepectolin